pul·chri·tu·di·nous [puhl-kri-tood-n-uhs, -tyood-]

adjective
physically beautiful; comely.

Origin:
1910–15, Americanism; < Latin pulchritūdin- (stem of pulchritūdō ) + -ous



pulchritudinous


yes
that is
actually
a real word
_ _
OO
>
\__/






Poetry by Commentally Ill
Read 516 times
Written on 2014-02-06 at 19:15

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shells
I am enlightened, in a beautiful way.
2014-02-08


Lawrence Beck The PoetBay support member heart!
It's a very full word, suggesting beauty of a Reubens sort, not a Vogue magazine sort.
2014-02-07


F.i.in.e Moods The PoetBay support member heart!
Doesn't sound very pretty for saying something is beautiful, though, does it? I have never seen this word before, and if I had, I wouldn't have guessed. Neat :)
2014-02-07



Cardinal Wolsey came to the royal court with a papal legation and made a speech to Henry VIII in which he described the king as 'Your noble persone, so formed and figured in shape and stature with force and pulchritude.'

from 1875, in an Iowa paper, the Burlington Weekly Hawk Eye: 'If we were Mrs. Livermore, we should object to being called ‘an amiable and pulchritudinous lady.’

—both extracts by World Wide Words, copyright © Michael Quinion, 1996–2014.

We Americans may have invented Jazz music, but I'm not sure we can claim, as an invention, this particular word as a 20th century Americanism. Nonetheless, it's a heckofa word.

I'm pretty sure, however, we can claim "doh," and no one will mind.

Cheers, and welcome back to our world c.i.
2014-02-06


Chaucer Whethers The PoetBay support member heart!
Aardvarks are pulchritudinous. Pulchritudinous.
2014-02-06